Over-wintering-roses in vietnam ceramic planters

A lot of the newer (and older), smaller roses are great for growing in vietnam ceramic planters on your patio, deck or even out in your garden.  I’ve always felt they look terrific with plants like herbs spilling out the sides.

rose
rose

But if you live in a climate that gets a real winter what do you with the vietnam ceramic planters and the rose when those cold north winds come blowing through?  If you leave the rose outside it will likely die from the cold, but since roses need full sun you can’t bring it inside.  Or can you?

blue-glazed-pots
blue-glazed-pots

Yes, you can and you should.  During winter a rose is totally dormant and because of this it doesn’t matter if it’s in the sun or not.  Now, I don’t advocate shutting it in a dark closet, but a non-heated room with some natural light is perfect.  Like a garage near a window.

Why unheated?

Because you want the rose to stay dormant during winter and placing it in a heated room will wake it up.  And once woken up it will need sunshine and since it’s too cold to put the rose outside….. well, you get the picture.

Simply wait for the rose to go naturally dormant and when that first deep freeze is forecast, like 25 F (-4 C) or below, go ahead and bring it inside.  Once inside don’t let the soil dry out but don’t water it regularly either.  Since the rose is dormant it won’t be taking up water.  Just make sure the soil remains slightly moist and you’ll be fine

pot-miniature-rose
pot-miniature-rose

Come spring when the rose starts to wake up take it back outside.  If you get an unexpected late spring freeze bring it back inside or just throw a blanket over it.

Roses in vietnam ceramic planters are a wonderful sight in any garden and even if you live in a cold climate keeping them for years to come is a snap.

Using Perennials in glazed ceramic pots  

When presented with the estimate for the list of annuals for containers on her terrace, my customer lamented, “It seems like so much money to spend on plants that will be thrown away at the end of the summer.” Aiming to please, I decided to experiment with perennials that could be used in ceramic planters and later transferred to the garden.

blue-glazed-pots
blue-glazed-pots

Before this, I hadn’t tried planting perennials in containers. At first, visions of flopping plants and pathetic foliage flashed through my head. What was I going to do about the fact that most perennials only bloom for about a month? I began looking through plant catalogs with a few requirements in mind.

First, I didn’t want anything that had to be staked or fussed with. Then I looked for plants with interesting textures and colorful foliage. Finally, I wanted to be able to reuse these plants in the garden. Some of the plants had to be able to withstand the relentless heat and sun of a southwestern exposure. Others needed to flourish in the shady conditions of the north side of the house. The ceramic planters needed to be planted by mid-May and still look good by the end of the summer.

My choices for that first season were a bit cautious, but they were successful. For the sunny side, I chose groupings of fountain grass, tickseed, tricolor sage, and aster. Because I planted in early May, I decided to use the annual white alyssum to spill out over the edge of the ceramic planters, to give it interest until the perennials kicked in. On the shady side, I used ‘Frances Williams’ hosta, bleeding heart, and spotted deadnettle, with the annual blue lobelia as an edging.

By the time I had finished, the containers looked respectably full, although a bit quiet. By mid-June, the perennials were so full that they almost covered up the alyssum and lobelia on the edges. The foliage colors of the hosta and lamium were cool and soothing on the shady refuge of the north-facing terrace, and the flowers and foliage of the bleeding heart lasted well into early fall. The tickseed beamed its pale yellow lights starting in July and was a handsome companion to the fountain grass. In August, when most ceramic planters are looking weary, mine were fresh and lively.

Water-Garden-in-Glazed-Ceramic-Bowl-Aqua-Scape
Water-Garden-in-Glazed-Ceramic-Bowl-Aqua-Scape

The perennial containers were much easier to care for than their annual counterparts. They required far less deadheading and deadleafing than annuals do. I was able to water them less often, and they didn’t get that tired look that annuals have around Labor Day. Also, I enjoyed watching the transition of the plants’ growth throughout the season. This was a great way to experiment with new plants. I had all summer to note their habits and changes and to decide where and how I wanted to use them in the garden.

I emptied the containers in October. Even though they still looked pretty good, I wanted the plants to have a chance to acclimate to the garden before the cold weather arrived. I carefully lifted the plants out using my trowel and hands. Some plants had grown quite a bit, so I divided them—an added bonus. I went around the garden with my “leftovers,” tucking them into all the bare areas. Some plants didn’t fit into the existing garden scheme just then, so I put them aside into a holding bed for the following year. I treated them all as new perennials, watering them in well and covering them with evergreen boughs after the ground froze to protect them from heaving.

Originally, I had planned for my containers to be at their peak in August and September, but experimenting with perennials over the years has shown me that I can have a palette of color and texture that changes throughout the season. The garden benefits from my regular fall infusions of plants, and having extra plants around is also great if I feel like starting a new project. When I’m planting new containers in spring and I need extra material, I can just go dig it out of a bed or divide an existing perennial. And best of all, as I pointed out to my client, we get two different uses out of the same plant. That’s garden synergy at its best.

VIETNAM CAMILLA JUMBO RIBBED GLAZED POT

Vietnam camilla jumbo ribbed glazed pot

Perfect for smaller gardens or patios, the Vietnam Camilla jumbo ribbed glazed pot is a unique way to add interest and beauty to your outdoor decor. This lovely, cast stone accent piece has a wide variety of uses. Add polished stones, seashells, or tiny flowering plants to create a unique focal point on your patio or side table.

Vietnam-Glazed-Camilla-Jumbo-Ribbed-Pot-Aqua
Vietnam-Glazed-Camilla-Jumbo-Ribbed-Pot-Aqua

Camilla Jumbo Ribbed Glazed Pots are the tallest Glazed pots that we stock, they make a statement even when they don’t have a plant in them. Suitable for upright plants where height is needed or just as suitable for a weeping plant. Not suitable however  for upright plants in a very windy position.

Dimensions

Size                           90cm Tall x 40cm Wide

63cm Tall x 30cm Wide

Color                        Antique; Aqua; Blue

Material                   Ceramic

Shape                       Round

Brand                        Hoang pottery

Usage                        Indoor , Outdoor

This designer glazed pot is made out of fully glazed ceramic and it is the perfect vessel to show off your single stems.  With this ceramic Camilla jumbo ribbed glazed pot you can design your own arrangement.  This pot even looks great with no flowers at all.  The pot are attached separately to the base so you can portion out water as you see fit.

Hoang Pottery Ltd is one of Vietnamese export companies in the field of ceramics, pottery, and relevant handicrafts as well. Fully priding ourselves in our skilled sourcing of the finest raw materials and our utmost attention to the top quality of our craftsmanship, we are focusing on our prospective transactions with multiple customers all over the world upon our product exclusivity originated from the natural materials in Vietnam.

Visit us : http://hoangpottery.com/