Its never too cold containers

Evergreen boughs, interesting pods and cones, and colorful stems and berries are just some of the botanical materials you can weave into a tall ceramic pots for plants design. If you are fortunate enough to live in a warm part of the country, living plants are also an option. In regions where freezing temperatures are the norm, gardeners should be aware that the living selections available to them, such as conifers and hardy boxwood, will contribute to big outdoor ceramic planters aesthetics but may not survive winter; extreme temperature changes are often too harsh for their sensitive roots.

christmas pots
christmas pots

If a material looks good and stands up to winter weather, why not reuse it from year to year? The reusable red bamboo poles in this pot offer a strong vertical accent, while living variegated boxwood provides more verticality and a striking backdrop.

ceramic pot
ceramic pot

 

Tall, bold gestures such as these are especially important in winter designs. People aren’t as likely to stop and linger when the weather is blustery, so designs need to read well from a distance. For this tall ceramic pots for plants, I wrapped dried magnolia leaves around African knobs (available at dried-flower retailers). Reconstructing natural materials and arranging them in clusters is another great way to make designs pop.

As a rule, more variety equals more impact. When designing tall ceramic pots for plants, use this to your advantage. Although there is a plethora of textures in this combination, similar forms unify them. Moss-covered orbs, poppy pods, and African knobs dot the horizontal plane, while cinnamon sticks, pheasant feathers, and whitewashed cacao stems add height. The simple vintage wooden rice bucket grounds the combo. In cold climates, keep wooden containers out of the elements as wood cracks after repeated freezing and thawing.

winter pot
winter pot

Look to the colorful glazes and decorative etchings on tall ceramic pots for plants as a source of inspiration. The detailed carving on this container draws the eye up to the planting, while the mahogany-stained kuwa stems and black-spruce boughs continue the progression up and out. Luckily, creating winter containers doesn’t have to mean gardening in frigid temperatures. For this container, I filled a plastic grower’s pot with potting soil and arranged the planting indoors. Once I finished the design, I brought it outside and slipped it into my decorative container. This durable granite pot won’t crack in winter, but buyers beware: Once you put it in place, you won’t be able to move it until spring thaw.

Thrillers-fillers-spillers in large ceramic outdoor pots

One of my favorite garden pastimes is cooking up new ideas for planting containers. I’ve never bothered to count just how many large ceramic outdoor pots I plant each year, but the number easily tops 100.

But no matter how many large ceramic outdoor pots I display, I’ve come to realize there’s no mystery in making a scrumptious container planting as long as I follow a simple three-ingredient recipe. First and foremost is what I call a “thriller,” a centerpiece plant with star quality, something big, bold, and beautiful. Then I add a few spicy “fillers,” foliage or flowering plants that will complement but not overwhelm the main player. Finally, I add a savory splash of mischief, a “spiller” that just tumbles out of the pot. As long as I use each of those kinds of plants—in various proportions—and take care to balance colors and textures, I can create a pot with pizzazz.

GardenDesign-GardeningwContainers1
GardenDesign-GardeningwContainers1

Thrillers work best in compositions where they are the tallest plant. For me, they are also the starting point in a container design. I select my thriller, then build around it. At planting time, the thriller goes in the center of a large ceramic outdoor pots that will be viewed from all sides or at the back of a pot that will be displayed in a corner or against a wall.

When planting a large ceramic outdoor pots, I position my fillers around the thriller. I often use a mix of plants for this job: some with foliar interest, others with flowers. For flowery fillers, I avoid perennial varieties in favor of uncommon, striking annuals or tender perennials for their much longer flowering season. Since the goal of container plants is to attract the eye, these plants add an alluring unusual flavor. I like bountiful-looking containers, so I cram in as many fillers as I can.

glazed ceramic garden pot
glazed ceramic garden pot

Spillers should do more than soften a pot and link it to its place. Well-chosen spillers continue the dialogue begun by the thriller and filler. To deepen that conversation, I look for spillers that echo or contrast with the pot’s other plants by virtue of shape, color, or texture.

Using Perennials in glazed ceramic pots  

When presented with the estimate for the list of annuals for containers on her terrace, my customer lamented, “It seems like so much money to spend on plants that will be thrown away at the end of the summer.” Aiming to please, I decided to experiment with perennials that could be used in ceramic planters and later transferred to the garden.

blue-glazed-pots
blue-glazed-pots

Before this, I hadn’t tried planting perennials in containers. At first, visions of flopping plants and pathetic foliage flashed through my head. What was I going to do about the fact that most perennials only bloom for about a month? I began looking through plant catalogs with a few requirements in mind.

First, I didn’t want anything that had to be staked or fussed with. Then I looked for plants with interesting textures and colorful foliage. Finally, I wanted to be able to reuse these plants in the garden. Some of the plants had to be able to withstand the relentless heat and sun of a southwestern exposure. Others needed to flourish in the shady conditions of the north side of the house. The ceramic planters needed to be planted by mid-May and still look good by the end of the summer.

My choices for that first season were a bit cautious, but they were successful. For the sunny side, I chose groupings of fountain grass, tickseed, tricolor sage, and aster. Because I planted in early May, I decided to use the annual white alyssum to spill out over the edge of the ceramic planters, to give it interest until the perennials kicked in. On the shady side, I used ‘Frances Williams’ hosta, bleeding heart, and spotted deadnettle, with the annual blue lobelia as an edging.

By the time I had finished, the containers looked respectably full, although a bit quiet. By mid-June, the perennials were so full that they almost covered up the alyssum and lobelia on the edges. The foliage colors of the hosta and lamium were cool and soothing on the shady refuge of the north-facing terrace, and the flowers and foliage of the bleeding heart lasted well into early fall. The tickseed beamed its pale yellow lights starting in July and was a handsome companion to the fountain grass. In August, when most ceramic planters are looking weary, mine were fresh and lively.

Water-Garden-in-Glazed-Ceramic-Bowl-Aqua-Scape
Water-Garden-in-Glazed-Ceramic-Bowl-Aqua-Scape

The perennial containers were much easier to care for than their annual counterparts. They required far less deadheading and deadleafing than annuals do. I was able to water them less often, and they didn’t get that tired look that annuals have around Labor Day. Also, I enjoyed watching the transition of the plants’ growth throughout the season. This was a great way to experiment with new plants. I had all summer to note their habits and changes and to decide where and how I wanted to use them in the garden.

I emptied the containers in October. Even though they still looked pretty good, I wanted the plants to have a chance to acclimate to the garden before the cold weather arrived. I carefully lifted the plants out using my trowel and hands. Some plants had grown quite a bit, so I divided them—an added bonus. I went around the garden with my “leftovers,” tucking them into all the bare areas. Some plants didn’t fit into the existing garden scheme just then, so I put them aside into a holding bed for the following year. I treated them all as new perennials, watering them in well and covering them with evergreen boughs after the ground froze to protect them from heaving.

Originally, I had planned for my containers to be at their peak in August and September, but experimenting with perennials over the years has shown me that I can have a palette of color and texture that changes throughout the season. The garden benefits from my regular fall infusions of plants, and having extra plants around is also great if I feel like starting a new project. When I’m planting new containers in spring and I need extra material, I can just go dig it out of a bed or divide an existing perennial. And best of all, as I pointed out to my client, we get two different uses out of the same plant. That’s garden synergy at its best.

Vietnam tall square outdoor ceramic pots

Hoang Pottery Company is a Vietnam pottery manufacturer & supplier of Home and Garden product such as: ceramic pots, pottery planters, ceramic vases, ceramic animal, ceramic statues, pottery water fountain, pottery Urns, ceramic pottery car , glazed terracotta, red terracotta, black terracotta, zinc, light cement, light terrazzo,…… All is handmade & being fired in the dragon kilns at the height temperature. The material to making the pottery products is local clay.

Vietnam glaze outdoor ceramic pots
Vietnam glaze outdoor ceramic pots

Quick Details

Type: Pots

Place of Origin: Vietnam

Brand Name: Hoang pottery

Model Number: VTT5012

Material: Vietnam tall square outdoor ceramic pots supplier

Vietnam glaze outdoor ceramic pots
Vietnam glaze outdoor ceramic pots

Quick Details

Type: Pots

Place of Origin: Vietnam

Brand Name: Hoang pottery

Model Number: VTT5012

Material: Vietnam tall square outdoor ceramic pots supplier

Vietnam large outdoor ceramic pots
Vietnam large outdoor ceramic pots

Quick Details

Type: Pots

Place of Origin: Vietnam

Brand Name: Hoang pottery

Model Number: VTT5012

Material: Vietnam tall square outdoor ceramic pots supplier

Visit us : http://hoangpottery.com/