Its never too cold containers

Evergreen boughs, interesting pods and cones, and colorful stems and berries are just some of the botanical materials you can weave into a tall ceramic pots for plants design. If you are fortunate enough to live in a warm part of the country, living plants are also an option. In regions where freezing temperatures are the norm, gardeners should be aware that the living selections available to them, such as conifers and hardy boxwood, will contribute to big outdoor ceramic planters aesthetics but may not survive winter; extreme temperature changes are often too harsh for their sensitive roots.

christmas pots
christmas pots

If a material looks good and stands up to winter weather, why not reuse it from year to year? The reusable red bamboo poles in this pot offer a strong vertical accent, while living variegated boxwood provides more verticality and a striking backdrop.

ceramic pot
ceramic pot

 

Tall, bold gestures such as these are especially important in winter designs. People aren’t as likely to stop and linger when the weather is blustery, so designs need to read well from a distance. For this tall ceramic pots for plants, I wrapped dried magnolia leaves around African knobs (available at dried-flower retailers). Reconstructing natural materials and arranging them in clusters is another great way to make designs pop.

As a rule, more variety equals more impact. When designing tall ceramic pots for plants, use this to your advantage. Although there is a plethora of textures in this combination, similar forms unify them. Moss-covered orbs, poppy pods, and African knobs dot the horizontal plane, while cinnamon sticks, pheasant feathers, and whitewashed cacao stems add height. The simple vintage wooden rice bucket grounds the combo. In cold climates, keep wooden containers out of the elements as wood cracks after repeated freezing and thawing.

winter pot
winter pot

Look to the colorful glazes and decorative etchings on tall ceramic pots for plants as a source of inspiration. The detailed carving on this container draws the eye up to the planting, while the mahogany-stained kuwa stems and black-spruce boughs continue the progression up and out. Luckily, creating winter containers doesn’t have to mean gardening in frigid temperatures. For this container, I filled a plastic grower’s pot with potting soil and arranged the planting indoors. Once I finished the design, I brought it outside and slipped it into my decorative container. This durable granite pot won’t crack in winter, but buyers beware: Once you put it in place, you won’t be able to move it until spring thaw.

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How to make better root in glazed ceramic pot

Each tomato label urges you to plant tomatoes deep in a glazed ceramic pot, so that a full 2/3 of the plant is underground. That means that if you buy a 10-inch tall plant, all but the top three inches is buried. Why? Because the plant will have a better, stronger root system. Better roots mean better tomatoes.

Whether in a big glazed ceramic pot or in the ground, set each tomato plant so that 2/3 of the plant is buried.

Rooftop-Garden
Rooftop-Garden

We know, we know. This goes against everything you’ve ever heard about “don’t plant too deeply or you’ll kill the plant.” Tomatoes break that rule. They sprout roots along the buried stem. The extra roots strengthen a plant so that it can support more fruit and is better able to survive hot weather. (This applies whether you’re growing in the ground, in a raised bed, or in a container.)

In really heavy soil, or if you just don’t want to dig deeply, you can lay the plant on its side, provided that it is at least 5 or 6 inches deep when buried, and that the ground beneath it isn’t hard as a brick. To do this, angle the plant so that the growing tip is above ground. If your soil drains poorly, create a raised bed with potting soil that is piled at least 8 inches above ground level.

galzed fountain
galzed fountain

Once you’ve nearly buried it in soil, only the top few inches of the plant will be exposed. Water well, label the plant (to help you remember which variety you’re growing), and watch your tomato plant grow big and strong. Within a few weeks, your plants with super roots will delight you with a bountiful harvest of lovely fruit.

Growing basil in a glazed ceramic pottery

A woody, branching plant, basil is a warm-weather annual that grows very fast in 80- to 90-degree weather. When growing basil, note that two or three plants will yield plenty of fresh basil for a family of four — unless you plan to make pesto. (To make and freeze a winter’s supply of pesto, plant a dozen or more.) Many gardeners mix various types of basil in their flower beds, where it is ready for a quick harvest anytime. It is also great for containers. Basil can be a beautiful addition to the garden and landscape. This pot of purple basil provides height, color, and flavor in a patio-side garden bed. You can plant a mix of different types of basil (in this case, sweet basil, spicy globe basil, and Thai basil) in a large, colorful glazed ceramic pottery. Not only will it look lovely sitting on the deck or patio, but it will also put a range of flavors at your fingertips.

basil-in-ceramic-pot
basil-in-ceramic-pot

Soil, Planting, And Care

basil needs 6 to 8 hours of sun; in the South and Southwest, it benefits from afternoon shade. Set out plants at least 2 weeks after the last frost in spring; summer planting is okay, too. Space at the distance recommended on the label, which is generally 12 to 18 inches apart. Plants are very frost sensitive, so keep plants protected in case of a late cold spell. Basil likes rich, moist, but well-drained soil with a pH of 6 to 7. Because basil is harvested continually for lots of leaves, it needs a little fertilizer. When planting, add plenty of organic nutrients from compost, blood meal, or cottonseed meal to the soil. Feed with Bonnie Herb, Vegetable & Flower Plant Food every couple of weeks to help keep tender new leaves coming on as you pinch back the stem tips.

soil-moist-growing-basil-in-a-pot
soil-moist-growing-basil-in-a-pot

If planting in a glazed ceramic pottery, use a large ceramic pot to keep the plants from drying out quickly in hot weather. You may also want to add a water-retaining polymer to the potting soil to keep the soil evenly moist and extend the time between waterings

Growing mint in a large ceramic pot

All types of mint (including sweet mint, spearmint, peppermint, and chocolate mint) are fast-growing, spreading plants, so you must give them a place to spread without getting in the way, or plant them in a large ceramic planter. Mint sends out runners that spread above and just below the ground, quickly forming large, lush green patches. In the right place it makes a pretty seasonal ground cover. You can also contain mint in tight places such as between pavers of a walkway where your feet will brush against the leaves to release its fragrance.

glazed ceramic pot
glazed ceramic pot

Because mint tends to take over, many gardeners plant mint in a small ceramic pot and then plant that pot in the ground or inside a large ceramic planter.

Plant mint in the spring, or in the fall in frost-free climates, setting seedlings 18 to 24 inches apart. The most popular way to grow mint is in a pot where you can keep it in check and handy near the kitchen for a constant supply of sprigs. Add water-retaining polymer to the potting soil to be sure that it stays moist.

In the ground, select a damp area in your garden in either full sun or part shade. Mint prefers fertile soil with a pH from 6.0 to 7.0. Mint is plenty vigorous on its own, but will appreciate a little fertilizer every few weeks, especially if you harvest a lot. Use Bonnie Herb & Vegetable Plant Food, which is low in salts and won’t cause leaf tips to brown. Keep the soil moist and mulch around the plant to keep its roots moist.

Pot growing
Pot growing

Keep plants in check by harvesting the tips regularly and pulling up wayward runners. Mint’s small flowers bloom from June to September; trim these before the buds open to keep the plant compact. Although slightly frost tolerant, the top of mint will eventually die back in winter except in zones 8 and south, but the root are quite hardy, surviving into zone 5 (some varieties even into zone 3). Lift and replant your mint every 3 to 4 years to keep your patch’s flavor and scent strong.

Easy container combos with glazed ceramic pot

Learn to grow easy vegetables in great looking container combos. You’ll love the candid advice and even the “bloopers” as she trialed over 1,700 plants in 200 containers to gather the material. Vegetables and flowers can make beautiful pot buddies.

container-garden-designs
container-garden-designs

Keep It Simple

“Don’t mix too many veggies in a big glazed pot. Keep it simple, like one tall vegetable in the center surrounded by a few flowers. Or, some big bold vegetables like okra and squash do better alone.”

Use Pretty

Pretty pots add to the overall effect, but they don’t have to be expensive. We used colorful buckets from the dollar store with holes punched in them for drainage to add pizzazz without costing much. Nice supports like painted trellises help the overall look, too. Many things work as containers: buckets, bushel baskets, washtubs, old wicker baskets, round glazed ceramic pot. Make sure that homemade containers have drainage holes, or make them yourself. Larger veggies, like tomato and eggplant, will need at least a 5-gallon container. Use the largest pot you can afford and have space for, especially with the big summer vegetables like squash, eggplant, tomatoes, and okra. The big plants need the room for the roots to grow.”

glazed ceramic pot plant
glazed ceramic pot plant

Some Veggies Are Okay Alone, But Most Like Flowers

“Big bold plants can stand alone in a pot, but most look much better accented with flowers. Use large plants in the center surrounded by smaller flowers and trailing flowers. Great vegetable centerpieces include pepper, tomato, eggplant, collard, cabbage, and kale.”

Step:

Plant tiny veggies first. Add flowers later.

Space plants closer than if in the ground.

Vegetables are easier in larger pots.

Use colorful trellises and pretty obelisks for supports.

Production varies a lot, use 236 Habanero peppers from one plant.

Vietnam large size outdoor glazed pot

Large Outdoor Glazed Ceramic Pot

Vietnam large size outdoor glazed pot

This glazed ceramic Planter is designed to give any patio or balcony the wow factor, giving you a visually stunning piece, that is contemporary and statuesque.

Large Outdoor Glazed Ceramic Pot
Large Outdoor Glazed Ceramic Pot

The Large ceramic pot is a solid planter that’ll serve you well in any setting. Crafted of steel, this planter features drainage holes on the bottom and a sleek, modern design.

  • Outdoor glazed construction
  • Square planter in clean, modern design
  • Features drainage holes on bottom panel
  • Suitable for both indoor or outdoor use
  • Choose from the available size and color options

The outdoor glazed pot high quality resin planter will make a beautiful addition to any home or garden. This durable, ceramic planter will hold up in extreme weather, is UV protected to eliminate fading in the sun, and is resistant to chipping and cracking. Drainage holes can be easily drilled for use outdoors or left undrilled for indoor use.

  • Made in USA
  • Ceramic clay construction
  • Suitable for indoor and outdoor use
  • UV resistant
  • Won’t crack or chip in temperatures to -20 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Size accommodates a large variety of plants and floral arrangements
  • Warranty – 3 years from date of purchase
  • Note: Product may vary by store

Love the planters, they are beautiful and of great quality. The shipping was fast and they arrived in perfect condition, great packaging.