Its never too cold containers

Evergreen boughs, interesting pods and cones, and colorful stems and berries are just some of the botanical materials you can weave into a tall ceramic pots for plants design. If you are fortunate enough to live in a warm part of the country, living plants are also an option. In regions where freezing temperatures are the norm, gardeners should be aware that the living selections available to them, such as conifers and hardy boxwood, will contribute to big outdoor ceramic planters aesthetics but may not survive winter; extreme temperature changes are often too harsh for their sensitive roots.

christmas pots
christmas pots

If a material looks good and stands up to winter weather, why not reuse it from year to year? The reusable red bamboo poles in this pot offer a strong vertical accent, while living variegated boxwood provides more verticality and a striking backdrop.

ceramic pot
ceramic pot

 

Tall, bold gestures such as these are especially important in winter designs. People aren’t as likely to stop and linger when the weather is blustery, so designs need to read well from a distance. For this tall ceramic pots for plants, I wrapped dried magnolia leaves around African knobs (available at dried-flower retailers). Reconstructing natural materials and arranging them in clusters is another great way to make designs pop.

As a rule, more variety equals more impact. When designing tall ceramic pots for plants, use this to your advantage. Although there is a plethora of textures in this combination, similar forms unify them. Moss-covered orbs, poppy pods, and African knobs dot the horizontal plane, while cinnamon sticks, pheasant feathers, and whitewashed cacao stems add height. The simple vintage wooden rice bucket grounds the combo. In cold climates, keep wooden containers out of the elements as wood cracks after repeated freezing and thawing.

winter pot
winter pot

Look to the colorful glazes and decorative etchings on tall ceramic pots for plants as a source of inspiration. The detailed carving on this container draws the eye up to the planting, while the mahogany-stained kuwa stems and black-spruce boughs continue the progression up and out. Luckily, creating winter containers doesn’t have to mean gardening in frigid temperatures. For this container, I filled a plastic grower’s pot with potting soil and arranged the planting indoors. Once I finished the design, I brought it outside and slipped it into my decorative container. This durable granite pot won’t crack in winter, but buyers beware: Once you put it in place, you won’t be able to move it until spring thaw.

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Thrillers-fillers-spillers in large ceramic outdoor pots

One of my favorite garden pastimes is cooking up new ideas for planting containers. I’ve never bothered to count just how many large ceramic outdoor pots I plant each year, but the number easily tops 100.

But no matter how many large ceramic outdoor pots I display, I’ve come to realize there’s no mystery in making a scrumptious container planting as long as I follow a simple three-ingredient recipe. First and foremost is what I call a “thriller,” a centerpiece plant with star quality, something big, bold, and beautiful. Then I add a few spicy “fillers,” foliage or flowering plants that will complement but not overwhelm the main player. Finally, I add a savory splash of mischief, a “spiller” that just tumbles out of the pot. As long as I use each of those kinds of plants—in various proportions—and take care to balance colors and textures, I can create a pot with pizzazz.

GardenDesign-GardeningwContainers1
GardenDesign-GardeningwContainers1

Thrillers work best in compositions where they are the tallest plant. For me, they are also the starting point in a container design. I select my thriller, then build around it. At planting time, the thriller goes in the center of a large ceramic outdoor pots that will be viewed from all sides or at the back of a pot that will be displayed in a corner or against a wall.

When planting a large ceramic outdoor pots, I position my fillers around the thriller. I often use a mix of plants for this job: some with foliar interest, others with flowers. For flowery fillers, I avoid perennial varieties in favor of uncommon, striking annuals or tender perennials for their much longer flowering season. Since the goal of container plants is to attract the eye, these plants add an alluring unusual flavor. I like bountiful-looking containers, so I cram in as many fillers as I can.

glazed ceramic garden pot
glazed ceramic garden pot

Spillers should do more than soften a pot and link it to its place. Well-chosen spillers continue the dialogue begun by the thriller and filler. To deepen that conversation, I look for spillers that echo or contrast with the pot’s other plants by virtue of shape, color, or texture.

How to make better root in glazed ceramic pot

Each tomato label urges you to plant tomatoes deep in a glazed ceramic pot, so that a full 2/3 of the plant is underground. That means that if you buy a 10-inch tall plant, all but the top three inches is buried. Why? Because the plant will have a better, stronger root system. Better roots mean better tomatoes.

Whether in a big glazed ceramic pot or in the ground, set each tomato plant so that 2/3 of the plant is buried.

Rooftop-Garden
Rooftop-Garden

We know, we know. This goes against everything you’ve ever heard about “don’t plant too deeply or you’ll kill the plant.” Tomatoes break that rule. They sprout roots along the buried stem. The extra roots strengthen a plant so that it can support more fruit and is better able to survive hot weather. (This applies whether you’re growing in the ground, in a raised bed, or in a container.)

In really heavy soil, or if you just don’t want to dig deeply, you can lay the plant on its side, provided that it is at least 5 or 6 inches deep when buried, and that the ground beneath it isn’t hard as a brick. To do this, angle the plant so that the growing tip is above ground. If your soil drains poorly, create a raised bed with potting soil that is piled at least 8 inches above ground level.

galzed fountain
galzed fountain

Once you’ve nearly buried it in soil, only the top few inches of the plant will be exposed. Water well, label the plant (to help you remember which variety you’re growing), and watch your tomato plant grow big and strong. Within a few weeks, your plants with super roots will delight you with a bountiful harvest of lovely fruit.

How to ceramic pot up a lush container

Cover the drainage holes with a mesh screen to prevent them from clogging and to keep soil from washing through onto your patio or deck.

Fill the ceramic pot with soil up to a few inches from the top using a top-quality, all-purpose potting mix. This will leave room for the bulk of your plants’ existing root-balls and soil. Add more soil if your plants are in small nursery pots.

Add slow-release fertilizer to the top of the soil. Using your fingers or a trowel, thoroughly and evenly work the fertilizer into the soil to a depth of 6 to 8 inches. Pack the soil and fertilizer mixture gently into the big ceramic pot with your hands, making sure there are no voids.

Plant large plants first, adding smaller plants as you move out toward the edges of the glazed pot. Fill in with soil as you go, making sure not to cover the tops of the roots with more than half an inch of soil.

Water the container slowly, with your sprayer set to a gentle shower, for up to 10 minutes to allow the new soil to absorb the water properly. You can stop watering when the water is flowing freely out of the container’s drainage holes.

Hoang Pottery Ltd is Vietnam pottery supplier of the highest quality service to all customers at reasonable prices over a wide range of products covering indoor pottery, outdoor glazed lines (flower pot), terracotta, terrazzo, cement, black clay, vases, fiberglass, fiberstone and others. Our policy of total quality management is fully applied to guarantee the quality, productivity, corporate values as well as social and environmental compliance.

Using Perennials in glazed ceramic pots  

When presented with the estimate for the list of annuals for containers on her terrace, my customer lamented, “It seems like so much money to spend on plants that will be thrown away at the end of the summer.” Aiming to please, I decided to experiment with perennials that could be used in ceramic planters and later transferred to the garden.

blue-glazed-pots
blue-glazed-pots

Before this, I hadn’t tried planting perennials in containers. At first, visions of flopping plants and pathetic foliage flashed through my head. What was I going to do about the fact that most perennials only bloom for about a month? I began looking through plant catalogs with a few requirements in mind.

First, I didn’t want anything that had to be staked or fussed with. Then I looked for plants with interesting textures and colorful foliage. Finally, I wanted to be able to reuse these plants in the garden. Some of the plants had to be able to withstand the relentless heat and sun of a southwestern exposure. Others needed to flourish in the shady conditions of the north side of the house. The ceramic planters needed to be planted by mid-May and still look good by the end of the summer.

My choices for that first season were a bit cautious, but they were successful. For the sunny side, I chose groupings of fountain grass, tickseed, tricolor sage, and aster. Because I planted in early May, I decided to use the annual white alyssum to spill out over the edge of the ceramic planters, to give it interest until the perennials kicked in. On the shady side, I used ‘Frances Williams’ hosta, bleeding heart, and spotted deadnettle, with the annual blue lobelia as an edging.

By the time I had finished, the containers looked respectably full, although a bit quiet. By mid-June, the perennials were so full that they almost covered up the alyssum and lobelia on the edges. The foliage colors of the hosta and lamium were cool and soothing on the shady refuge of the north-facing terrace, and the flowers and foliage of the bleeding heart lasted well into early fall. The tickseed beamed its pale yellow lights starting in July and was a handsome companion to the fountain grass. In August, when most ceramic planters are looking weary, mine were fresh and lively.

Water-Garden-in-Glazed-Ceramic-Bowl-Aqua-Scape
Water-Garden-in-Glazed-Ceramic-Bowl-Aqua-Scape

The perennial containers were much easier to care for than their annual counterparts. They required far less deadheading and deadleafing than annuals do. I was able to water them less often, and they didn’t get that tired look that annuals have around Labor Day. Also, I enjoyed watching the transition of the plants’ growth throughout the season. This was a great way to experiment with new plants. I had all summer to note their habits and changes and to decide where and how I wanted to use them in the garden.

I emptied the containers in October. Even though they still looked pretty good, I wanted the plants to have a chance to acclimate to the garden before the cold weather arrived. I carefully lifted the plants out using my trowel and hands. Some plants had grown quite a bit, so I divided them—an added bonus. I went around the garden with my “leftovers,” tucking them into all the bare areas. Some plants didn’t fit into the existing garden scheme just then, so I put them aside into a holding bed for the following year. I treated them all as new perennials, watering them in well and covering them with evergreen boughs after the ground froze to protect them from heaving.

Originally, I had planned for my containers to be at their peak in August and September, but experimenting with perennials over the years has shown me that I can have a palette of color and texture that changes throughout the season. The garden benefits from my regular fall infusions of plants, and having extra plants around is also great if I feel like starting a new project. When I’m planting new containers in spring and I need extra material, I can just go dig it out of a bed or divide an existing perennial. And best of all, as I pointed out to my client, we get two different uses out of the same plant. That’s garden synergy at its best.

How to Build a Large Outdoor Ceramic Pot Fountain

Nothing is more relaxing than the sound of moving water in the garden. Here’s how to build a one-of-a-kind water feature in a weekend.

This water feature consists of an underground, waterproof basin; sturdy grating; and a large outdoor ceramic pot of your choice. Most of the supplies you will need can be found at a plumbing supply or hardware store or a nursery that carries water garden supplies.

fountainscape
fountainscape

Step 1: Plumb the pot

For this step, you’ll need your large ceramic pot, a 1 3/4″ by 1″ barb fitting, a 1 3/4″ PVC female adapter, plumbers epoxy, and a drill with a half-inch masonry bit.

First, using a masonry bit, create a drainage hole in the bottom of the ceramic pot. If yours already has a hole, it’ll probably need to be widened by slowly rotating the masonry bit around the sides of the hole.

Then put the barb fitting into the hole so the threaded end goes inside the glazed pot.

Next, thread the PVC female adapter onto the end of the barb inside of the pot.

Finally, put plumber’s epoxy around the base of the fitting to seal it in place and make the container watertight.

Step 2: Install the reservoir

For this step, you’ll need a waterproof catch basin, a few cinder blocks, some sand, a heavy duty plastic grate, four feet of flexible tubing, a submersible pump, two hose clamps, flexible screen/mesh, and a reciprocating saw.

TIP: A pot 30 inches tall or less will need a pump rated at 950 gallons per hour (gph) or less. A taller pot requires 950 gallons or more.

Dig a hole deep enough to allow your catch basin to sit slightly above ground level.

Shovel in a 1″ layer of sand. This allows you to easily level the reservoir by shifting the sand.

Place two or three cinder blocks in the center of the basin to give additional support to the pot.

Cut a trap door in the corner of the plastic grate that is large enough for the pump to easily pass through. This gives you easy access to the pump for maintenance without having to disassemble the entire fountain.

Cut a small hole in the center of the grate for the flexible tubing.

Attach the one end of the tubing to the pump, clamp it in place, and poke the other end out the hole in the center of the grate.

Place the screening over the grate and cut a corresponding hole for the flexible tubing.

galzed fountain
galzed fountain

Step 3: Place the fountain

For this step, you will a length of 3/4″ PVC pipe, black spray paint, and some decorative stones.

Cut a piece of 3/4″ PVC pipe so that it is the same height as the pot and spray the top 6″ with black paint.

Then, place the PVC pipe (black side up) into the PVC female adaptor in the bottom of the pot.

Bring the ceramic pot over to reservoir. Twist the flexible tubing onto the barb sticking out of the bottom of the pot and clamp in place.

Slowly lift the pot into a standing position. If you have a large pot, you may need a friend to help you with this step.

Place decorative stones on top of the screening to disguise the reservoir.

Then, fill the reservoir with water, turn on the pump, and enjoy.

Using Outdoor Ceramic Pots as Elements of a Design

Looking out the window at my garden, I find it hard to imagine it without containers. Sixty of them, strategically placed throughout my garden, provide design solutions for difficult places.

I use outdoor ceramic pots as major structural elements to help create the framework of the garden, or as visual cues to lead the eye along a path or toward a destination. I also place them to screen unsightly views. Patios, decks, and entryways become lush, intimate spaces when I embellish them with containers. And I often add outdoor ceramic pots to a bed or border to introduce a new color or shape.

perennial-flower-garden
perennial-flower-garden

Artfully designed and beautifully planted containers are striking on their own, but using them throughout a design also adds a sense of coherence to a garden. Here are some examples, from gardens I have designed and others I have visited, of the way careful and considered placement of containers can be used to resolve design challenges.

By arranging a group of three ceramic pots together on a brick pad at the base of a large arbor in my back garden, I was able to link the vertical structure to the horizontal ground plane and create the illusion that the arbor is surrounded by a garden rather than by a lawn (below left). The massing of plants at the base of the arbor also balances the overhead tangle of rose canes and clematis vines.

Placing a outdoor ceramic pot where several sight lines or pathways converge (above right) draws the eye forward and pulls you into the garden. The ceramic pot becomes a focal point, acting as a major structural element of the design.

Throughout the garden, I strategically place containers to help direct traffic and alert visitors to changes as they move from one space to the next. I use groups of pots on either side of a step to signal an elevation change.

CONTAINER-GARDENS
CONTAINER-GARDENS

Pots sitting in a path (above) or on the edge of a walkway or deck force you to slow down and consider the garden as you walk by. I also use ceramic pots to signal the transition between paved and unpaved surfaces. I set a group of terra-cotta pots on the corner of my terrace to prevent visitors from stepping off into the garden and forging a new trail in the lawn. By lining my stairs with large pots, I subtly lure visitors from the front walk to the porch. Every three months, I install new plant combinations that reflect the changing cycle of the seasons so visitors always have something new to look at.

I often use pots to add height or color to a garden bed where these elements are missing. In one garden (right), I placed a pot of annuals in a border when a shot of color was needed. I like the versatility of switching glazed ceramic pots in and out of beds and the ability to change the feel of the garden by manipulating small vignettes on a moment’s notice. At a friend’s garden, a cobalt-blue pot placed in a dark spot in a bed draws your eye in and makes the space seem larger while it unites the garden and architecture by echoing the color of the nearby house.

Containers situated in outdoor living areas (right) become part of the furnishings, adding visual interest, color, and fragrance. Here, an empty deck comes alive when filled with pots of annuals and perennials planted to provide a succession of color throughout the summer. Even the smallest balcony or terrace can be transformed into a lush Eden by groups of pots.

Planting Spring Bulbs in tall ceramic pots.

When I plant containers of bulbs in the fall, I’m thinking of the color and drama they will add to the following spring’s landscape. Not only will these planted pots create focal points through­out the garden, but they will also welcome visitors at entryways and add a touch of bright color to the spring garden.

Any bulb can be planted in a container, but tulips are by far my favorite because of their simple form and the infinite choice of colors. You can combine different types of bulbs in a single tall ceramic pot, but be sure they bloom at the same time or the earlier bulb’s dying foliage will mar the display of the later-flowering bulb. I prefer to plant only one type of bulb per container to get the maximum impact. By choosing bulbs with staggered bloom times we have a succession of flowers from early March through mid-May.

contgard
contgard

I plant our bulbs in late October in tall ceramic pots with good drainage. In a 24-inch container I plant either 50 tulips, 30 large-flowered daffodils, 50 small-flowered daffodils, or 100 minor bulbs, like Crocus, Muscari, Scilla, or Iris species or cultivars. I fill the pot with a soil mix that drains very well so the bulbs will sit in moist but not soggy soil. I plant the bulbs just as I would in the ground, at a soil depth of twice the diameter of the bulb.

If I am planting more than one type of bulb in the same ceramic pot and they require different planting depths, I layer the bulbs (illustration at right). I fill the glazed ceramic pot to the right level and plant the larger bulbs, then cover them with soil until it’s at the proper depth to plant the smaller bulbs. Finally, I fill the container with soil, being sure to leave at least 1/2 inch of space between the surface of the soil and the top of the container for easy watering.

I water the planted container thoroughly, then water periodically through­out the winter. The bulbs should not sit in soil that is too wet, but you also don’t want them to dry out entirely.

To plant a ceramic pot with different species of bulbs, plant the larger bulbs first, then cover them with soil and plant the smaller bulbs. Fill the container with soil to just below the rim.

Lantana-in-Plant-Container-Design
Lantana-in-Plant-Container-Design

Gardening in Seattle makes overwintering bulbs in containers rather easy. I use mostly stoneware pots because they can be left outside through the winter. Our mild winters allow us to group the pots together tightly in our nursery and leave them outside for the season.

If your winter is just too severe to risk leaving the bulbs out or you want to use bulbs in a tall ceramic pot that can’t be stored in the cold, you have another option. Plant your bulbs in small 6-inch or 8-inch ceramic pots and overwinter them under protection outdoors or in a cold garage. In the spring, as they start to bloom, you can then sink the pots into larger display containers. Bring your  tall ceramic pots outside in the spring when the danger of hard frost has passed or when the bulbs in the ground are starting to emerge.

After the flowers have faded and the spring gala is over, I plant all the bulbs except for the tulips in the garden. Tulips tend not to do well in subsequent years, so I compost them. Then I start thinking ahead to the varieties I’ll be planting up in the fall for next year’s display.

Blue outdoor glazed pot

Blue outdoor glazed pot

 

Provide a wonderful focal point in your garden with this traditional, elegant Blue outdoor glazed pot. Add a touch of sophistication and beauty to the patio, yard, balcony or porch areas.

Planters make it possible for anyone to experience the joy of gardening and provide the opportunity to cultivate and produce favourite herbs, vegetables as well as plants, flowers, shrubs and even small trees. They even look good indoors!

The Blue outdoor glazed pot is constructed of hand-woven strands of Hoang pottery. Each weather-defying planter features a rust-proof, powder-coated aluminum frame to further enhance its strength. Antique bronze in color, these planters will look elegant at your front door or in your living room.

Glazed blue french planter
Glazed blue french planter

Hoang pottery Products has developed a reputation as one of the leading manufacturers of unique products for the home and garden. They are committed to designing and producing great looking products with undeniable consumer value. They are constantly working on new and innovative products to enhance your home or business.The glazed ceramic products cares about your health and the environment. They are proud to say that they do not use lead-based paints or finishes on any of their products.

Great for accenting outdoor environments like decks and patios with attractive floral arrangements, Blue outdoor ceramic Planters are a durable, lightweight alternative to heavy ceramic pottery. Elevated feet promote airflow to reduce mold and mildew, drainage holes protect plants from overwatering, and an attached tray eliminates messy spills while protecting your deck or patio from stains. The all-weather design stands up to the elements and UV protection helps prevent fading.

Great for accenting outdoor environments like decks and patios with attractive floral arrangements,Outdoor glazed ceramic are a durable, lightweight alternative to heavy ceramic pottery. Elevated feet promote airflow to reduce mold and mildew, drainage holes protect plants from overwatering, and an attached tray eliminates messy spills while protecting your deck or patio from stains. The all-weather design stands up to the elements and UV protection helps prevent fading. All Dayton Planters are made in the USA.

This big size glazed outdoor glazed pot is the perfect addition to your garden, walkway, patio, or anywhere a smaller planter is needed. A little over 1.5 feet in diameter these smaller concrete planters work well on both residential and commercial properties to accent plants in outdoor dining and recreational areas unable to accommodate a large concrete planter. If you have the need for both large and small concrete planters we offer matching styles in various sizes, this one being the smallest. This planter is decorative and for planting only and cannot be used as a form of barrier protection, like our larger planters, as it only weighs 60 lbs.

Contemporary Square Ceramic Decoration Pot

Choose the best place to plant your garden with the Contemporary Square Ceramic Decoration Pot in.. Crafted from beautiful and durable wood with strong and sturdy legs, this planting bed allows you to grow your favorite plants in nutrient rich soil and also gives you options on the best place to plant your garden. Plant your own salsa garden with the Contemporary Square Ceramic Decoration Pot in. with cilantro, green onions and red peppers. Great for yards and areas with little or no soil, you’ll love growing your favorite flowers and vegetables.

vietnam big glazed ceramic pot
vietnam big glazed ceramic pot

Dimension : 30×26

Color: White

Material Vietnam Ceramic planter

Shape: Square

Brand: Hoang pottery

Usage: Indoor , Outdoor
This Vietnam glazed ceramic flower pot is a delightful hexagonal planter nestles five matching pots and is just perfect for growing your own herb garden. You can grow all your own herbs for cooking, in this charming honeycomb arrangement and have them ready to eat all year long.

You will also be helping the planet as these planters are manufactured from high quality glazed ceramic planter managed forests.

The herb wheel has a base and it takes 50 litres of compost to fill to the top.

As a relative newby to the gardening scene, I am easily excited, but my herb wheel is the best thing of all my purchases. It looks amazing, real quality wood and so easy to plant up, with adequate drainage in each section. This hexagonal beauty really stands out on the patio – it makes me want to have a garden party immediately! When my order 1st arrive I only got one section of the herb wheel but customer services were excellent and I soon after received the full set. I’d say it’s a must for anyone wanting to start their own little herb garden and love that each section is independent.