Over-wintering-roses in vietnam ceramic planters

A lot of the newer (and older), smaller roses are great for growing in vietnam ceramic planters on your patio, deck or even out in your garden.  I’ve always felt they look terrific with plants like herbs spilling out the sides.

rose
rose

But if you live in a climate that gets a real winter what do you with the vietnam ceramic planters and the rose when those cold north winds come blowing through?  If you leave the rose outside it will likely die from the cold, but since roses need full sun you can’t bring it inside.  Or can you?

blue-glazed-pots
blue-glazed-pots

Yes, you can and you should.  During winter a rose is totally dormant and because of this it doesn’t matter if it’s in the sun or not.  Now, I don’t advocate shutting it in a dark closet, but a non-heated room with some natural light is perfect.  Like a garage near a window.

Why unheated?

Because you want the rose to stay dormant during winter and placing it in a heated room will wake it up.  And once woken up it will need sunshine and since it’s too cold to put the rose outside….. well, you get the picture.

Simply wait for the rose to go naturally dormant and when that first deep freeze is forecast, like 25 F (-4 C) or below, go ahead and bring it inside.  Once inside don’t let the soil dry out but don’t water it regularly either.  Since the rose is dormant it won’t be taking up water.  Just make sure the soil remains slightly moist and you’ll be fine

pot-miniature-rose
pot-miniature-rose

Come spring when the rose starts to wake up take it back outside.  If you get an unexpected late spring freeze bring it back inside or just throw a blanket over it.

Roses in vietnam ceramic planters are a wonderful sight in any garden and even if you live in a cold climate keeping them for years to come is a snap.

How a practiced propagator gets seedlings off to a healthy start

 

  1. KEEP RECORDS TO ALLOW FOR BETTER PLANNING

An often overlooked aspect of plant propagation is the art of record keeping. Whether you are producing a few plants for your home flower and vegetable gardens or working at a larger-scale nursery, developing a propagation journal will prove indispensable. We record when seeds are sown, the germination date and success rate, and when seedlings are ready for transplanting each year. At the end of the year we evaluate the timing of our production schedule, noting what went right and what went wrong. These observations help us make adjustments for next year to ensure that we are growing our plants under optimum conditions. We also keep track of where we purchase seeds, as their quality and reliability may vary by source.

  1. STORE SEED PROPERLY TO MAINTAIN VIABILITY
Eggplant-seedlings
Eggplant-seedlings

Seeds are a fragile commodity, and if not treated properly, their viability will sharply decline. While some seeds may survive for thousands of years under the proper conditions, others will lose viability quickly, even when properly stored. To maintain dormancy, keep seeds in a cool, dark location with low humidity, like a refrigerator. I recommend labeling them (seed name, source, year) and storing them in a small reclosable bag or empty film canister that is, in turn, kept in a large outdoor ceramic planters. Once you are ready to sow, you can test the viability of many, but not all, seeds by soaking them in water for a few hours. The seeds that are still living will sink to the bottom, while the dead ones will float on the surface. This test generally works better for larger seeds, but there are no absolutes.

Large outdoor ceramic planters are preferable to clay pots when starting seeds, as they retain moisture more consistently. Wide, shallow containers prevent both overcrowding of seedlings and excessive moisture around fragile, young roots. Plants that resent root disturbance when transplanted are best sown into small, individual containers like cell packs or plug trays. Large outdoor ceramic planters, like empty yogurt or margarine tubs, work well, too, provided you’ve poked holes in the bottom for drainage. No matter what type of container you use, it must be clean and free of pathogens. To sanitize a container, soak it in a 10 percent bleach solution for 15 minutes

  1. TAMP SEEDS DOWN TO MAKE DIRECT CONTACT WITH THE SOIL

Use a kitchen sieve to spread soilless seed-starting mix evenly over the top of the seeds to the depth of two times the seed diameter. Very small seeds and those that require light to germinate should lie directly on the surface. Whether covered with planting medium or not, each seed must be in firm contact with the moist surface to begin germinating. Use a pestle or even the bottom of a glass to gently tamp down the surface.

sunflower-seedling
sunflower-seedling
  1. PREVENT DISEASE BY PROVIDING AIR FLOW AND DRAINAGE

The fungal infection often referred to as damping-off is usually caused by excessive moisture and poor air circulation. However, there are a few cultural techniques that will help to keep fungal agents at bay. After covering the seeds with planting mix and tamping them down, spread a thin layer of 50 percent milled sphagnum and 50 percent starter chicken grit (finely ground stone) over the surface to keep the soil around the emerging shoots dry and provide an inhospitable environment for pathogens. To promote good air circulation, place a small fan near your seedlings. Keep the fan on low and direct it to blow across the large outdoor ceramic planters at the soil level where air may become trapped and stagnant.

  1. COVER TRAYS WITH PLASTIC WRAP TO KEEP THE MOISTURE LEVEL CONSTANT

Seeds are very sensitive to the extremes of overwatering and underwatering. In addition, heavy-handed watering can disturb newly germinated seedlings. Securing plastic wrap over the surface of a freshly sown seed pot can help to keep the moisture level constant. However, the large outdoor ceramic planter must still be checked daily for moisture and germination. If you find that you need to rehydrate your seed container, place the entire pot in a basin with 2 to 3 inches of warm water and allow the planting medium to wick moisture from the bottom. If just the surface has dried, you can lift the plastic covering and spritz the surface with water from a spray bottle. As soon as the seeds germinate, remove the plastic wrap.

  1. KEEP SEEDS WARM TO ENCOURAGE GERMINATION

Most seeds require temperatures of 65° to 75°F to germinate. Placing seed containers near an existing heater or using a space heater with the proper precautions can raise the ambient temperature as needed. In addition, a heating pad designed for plant use placed directly under the seed containers will warm the planting mix and encourage germination. When using any additional heat source, be sure to check for moisture often, since the seed containers may dry out more quickly.

  1. TURN SEEDLINGS DAILY TO KEEP STEMS STRONG

Most seeds will not germinate without sunlight and will perform best with 12 to 16 hours each day. Indoors, place seed containers in a sunny, south-facing window and give the container a quarter turn each day to prevent the seedlings from overreaching toward the light and developing weak, elongated stems. Also, gently brush the palm of your hand against the tops of the seedlings to encourage strong stem growth.

  1. FEED THEM WELL

Proper nutrition at a consistent rate will keep your seedlings growing strong. When the embryo inside a seed is developing, it relies on food stored in the endosperm to fuel its growth. As the shoot emerges from the soil and the true leaves develop, the initial nutrients supplied by the endosperm will be depleted and supplemental fertilization is then required. Most seed-starting mixes contain a small nutrient charge to help make this transition while not burning the developing roots. However, once the true leaves emerge, it is time to begin a half-strength liquid fertilizer regimen on a weekly basis.

Growing basil in a glazed ceramic pottery

A woody, branching plant, basil is a warm-weather annual that grows very fast in 80- to 90-degree weather. When growing basil, note that two or three plants will yield plenty of fresh basil for a family of four — unless you plan to make pesto. (To make and freeze a winter’s supply of pesto, plant a dozen or more.) Many gardeners mix various types of basil in their flower beds, where it is ready for a quick harvest anytime. It is also great for containers. Basil can be a beautiful addition to the garden and landscape. This pot of purple basil provides height, color, and flavor in a patio-side garden bed. You can plant a mix of different types of basil (in this case, sweet basil, spicy globe basil, and Thai basil) in a large, colorful glazed ceramic pottery. Not only will it look lovely sitting on the deck or patio, but it will also put a range of flavors at your fingertips.

basil-in-ceramic-pot
basil-in-ceramic-pot

Soil, Planting, And Care

basil needs 6 to 8 hours of sun; in the South and Southwest, it benefits from afternoon shade. Set out plants at least 2 weeks after the last frost in spring; summer planting is okay, too. Space at the distance recommended on the label, which is generally 12 to 18 inches apart. Plants are very frost sensitive, so keep plants protected in case of a late cold spell. Basil likes rich, moist, but well-drained soil with a pH of 6 to 7. Because basil is harvested continually for lots of leaves, it needs a little fertilizer. When planting, add plenty of organic nutrients from compost, blood meal, or cottonseed meal to the soil. Feed with Bonnie Herb, Vegetable & Flower Plant Food every couple of weeks to help keep tender new leaves coming on as you pinch back the stem tips.

soil-moist-growing-basil-in-a-pot
soil-moist-growing-basil-in-a-pot

If planting in a glazed ceramic pottery, use a large ceramic pot to keep the plants from drying out quickly in hot weather. You may also want to add a water-retaining polymer to the potting soil to keep the soil evenly moist and extend the time between waterings

Growing mint in a large ceramic pot

All types of mint (including sweet mint, spearmint, peppermint, and chocolate mint) are fast-growing, spreading plants, so you must give them a place to spread without getting in the way, or plant them in a large ceramic planter. Mint sends out runners that spread above and just below the ground, quickly forming large, lush green patches. In the right place it makes a pretty seasonal ground cover. You can also contain mint in tight places such as between pavers of a walkway where your feet will brush against the leaves to release its fragrance.

glazed ceramic pot
glazed ceramic pot

Because mint tends to take over, many gardeners plant mint in a small ceramic pot and then plant that pot in the ground or inside a large ceramic planter.

Plant mint in the spring, or in the fall in frost-free climates, setting seedlings 18 to 24 inches apart. The most popular way to grow mint is in a pot where you can keep it in check and handy near the kitchen for a constant supply of sprigs. Add water-retaining polymer to the potting soil to be sure that it stays moist.

In the ground, select a damp area in your garden in either full sun or part shade. Mint prefers fertile soil with a pH from 6.0 to 7.0. Mint is plenty vigorous on its own, but will appreciate a little fertilizer every few weeks, especially if you harvest a lot. Use Bonnie Herb & Vegetable Plant Food, which is low in salts and won’t cause leaf tips to brown. Keep the soil moist and mulch around the plant to keep its roots moist.

Pot growing
Pot growing

Keep plants in check by harvesting the tips regularly and pulling up wayward runners. Mint’s small flowers bloom from June to September; trim these before the buds open to keep the plant compact. Although slightly frost tolerant, the top of mint will eventually die back in winter except in zones 8 and south, but the root are quite hardy, surviving into zone 5 (some varieties even into zone 3). Lift and replant your mint every 3 to 4 years to keep your patch’s flavor and scent strong.

How to Build a Large Outdoor Ceramic Pot Fountain

Nothing is more relaxing than the sound of moving water in the garden. Here’s how to build a one-of-a-kind water feature in a weekend.

This water feature consists of an underground, waterproof basin; sturdy grating; and a large outdoor ceramic pot of your choice. Most of the supplies you will need can be found at a plumbing supply or hardware store or a nursery that carries water garden supplies.

fountainscape
fountainscape

Step 1: Plumb the pot

For this step, you’ll need your large ceramic pot, a 1 3/4″ by 1″ barb fitting, a 1 3/4″ PVC female adapter, plumbers epoxy, and a drill with a half-inch masonry bit.

First, using a masonry bit, create a drainage hole in the bottom of the ceramic pot. If yours already has a hole, it’ll probably need to be widened by slowly rotating the masonry bit around the sides of the hole.

Then put the barb fitting into the hole so the threaded end goes inside the glazed pot.

Next, thread the PVC female adapter onto the end of the barb inside of the pot.

Finally, put plumber’s epoxy around the base of the fitting to seal it in place and make the container watertight.

Step 2: Install the reservoir

For this step, you’ll need a waterproof catch basin, a few cinder blocks, some sand, a heavy duty plastic grate, four feet of flexible tubing, a submersible pump, two hose clamps, flexible screen/mesh, and a reciprocating saw.

TIP: A pot 30 inches tall or less will need a pump rated at 950 gallons per hour (gph) or less. A taller pot requires 950 gallons or more.

Dig a hole deep enough to allow your catch basin to sit slightly above ground level.

Shovel in a 1″ layer of sand. This allows you to easily level the reservoir by shifting the sand.

Place two or three cinder blocks in the center of the basin to give additional support to the pot.

Cut a trap door in the corner of the plastic grate that is large enough for the pump to easily pass through. This gives you easy access to the pump for maintenance without having to disassemble the entire fountain.

Cut a small hole in the center of the grate for the flexible tubing.

Attach the one end of the tubing to the pump, clamp it in place, and poke the other end out the hole in the center of the grate.

Place the screening over the grate and cut a corresponding hole for the flexible tubing.

galzed fountain
galzed fountain

Step 3: Place the fountain

For this step, you will a length of 3/4″ PVC pipe, black spray paint, and some decorative stones.

Cut a piece of 3/4″ PVC pipe so that it is the same height as the pot and spray the top 6″ with black paint.

Then, place the PVC pipe (black side up) into the PVC female adaptor in the bottom of the pot.

Bring the ceramic pot over to reservoir. Twist the flexible tubing onto the barb sticking out of the bottom of the pot and clamp in place.

Slowly lift the pot into a standing position. If you have a large pot, you may need a friend to help you with this step.

Place decorative stones on top of the screening to disguise the reservoir.

Then, fill the reservoir with water, turn on the pump, and enjoy.

Using Outdoor Ceramic Pots as Elements of a Design

Looking out the window at my garden, I find it hard to imagine it without containers. Sixty of them, strategically placed throughout my garden, provide design solutions for difficult places.

I use outdoor ceramic pots as major structural elements to help create the framework of the garden, or as visual cues to lead the eye along a path or toward a destination. I also place them to screen unsightly views. Patios, decks, and entryways become lush, intimate spaces when I embellish them with containers. And I often add outdoor ceramic pots to a bed or border to introduce a new color or shape.

perennial-flower-garden
perennial-flower-garden

Artfully designed and beautifully planted containers are striking on their own, but using them throughout a design also adds a sense of coherence to a garden. Here are some examples, from gardens I have designed and others I have visited, of the way careful and considered placement of containers can be used to resolve design challenges.

By arranging a group of three ceramic pots together on a brick pad at the base of a large arbor in my back garden, I was able to link the vertical structure to the horizontal ground plane and create the illusion that the arbor is surrounded by a garden rather than by a lawn (below left). The massing of plants at the base of the arbor also balances the overhead tangle of rose canes and clematis vines.

Placing a outdoor ceramic pot where several sight lines or pathways converge (above right) draws the eye forward and pulls you into the garden. The ceramic pot becomes a focal point, acting as a major structural element of the design.

Throughout the garden, I strategically place containers to help direct traffic and alert visitors to changes as they move from one space to the next. I use groups of pots on either side of a step to signal an elevation change.

CONTAINER-GARDENS
CONTAINER-GARDENS

Pots sitting in a path (above) or on the edge of a walkway or deck force you to slow down and consider the garden as you walk by. I also use ceramic pots to signal the transition between paved and unpaved surfaces. I set a group of terra-cotta pots on the corner of my terrace to prevent visitors from stepping off into the garden and forging a new trail in the lawn. By lining my stairs with large pots, I subtly lure visitors from the front walk to the porch. Every three months, I install new plant combinations that reflect the changing cycle of the seasons so visitors always have something new to look at.

I often use pots to add height or color to a garden bed where these elements are missing. In one garden (right), I placed a pot of annuals in a border when a shot of color was needed. I like the versatility of switching glazed ceramic pots in and out of beds and the ability to change the feel of the garden by manipulating small vignettes on a moment’s notice. At a friend’s garden, a cobalt-blue pot placed in a dark spot in a bed draws your eye in and makes the space seem larger while it unites the garden and architecture by echoing the color of the nearby house.

Containers situated in outdoor living areas (right) become part of the furnishings, adding visual interest, color, and fragrance. Here, an empty deck comes alive when filled with pots of annuals and perennials planted to provide a succession of color throughout the summer. Even the smallest balcony or terrace can be transformed into a lush Eden by groups of pots.

Planting Spring Bulbs in tall ceramic pots.

When I plant containers of bulbs in the fall, I’m thinking of the color and drama they will add to the following spring’s landscape. Not only will these planted pots create focal points through­out the garden, but they will also welcome visitors at entryways and add a touch of bright color to the spring garden.

Any bulb can be planted in a container, but tulips are by far my favorite because of their simple form and the infinite choice of colors. You can combine different types of bulbs in a single tall ceramic pot, but be sure they bloom at the same time or the earlier bulb’s dying foliage will mar the display of the later-flowering bulb. I prefer to plant only one type of bulb per container to get the maximum impact. By choosing bulbs with staggered bloom times we have a succession of flowers from early March through mid-May.

contgard
contgard

I plant our bulbs in late October in tall ceramic pots with good drainage. In a 24-inch container I plant either 50 tulips, 30 large-flowered daffodils, 50 small-flowered daffodils, or 100 minor bulbs, like Crocus, Muscari, Scilla, or Iris species or cultivars. I fill the pot with a soil mix that drains very well so the bulbs will sit in moist but not soggy soil. I plant the bulbs just as I would in the ground, at a soil depth of twice the diameter of the bulb.

If I am planting more than one type of bulb in the same ceramic pot and they require different planting depths, I layer the bulbs (illustration at right). I fill the glazed ceramic pot to the right level and plant the larger bulbs, then cover them with soil until it’s at the proper depth to plant the smaller bulbs. Finally, I fill the container with soil, being sure to leave at least 1/2 inch of space between the surface of the soil and the top of the container for easy watering.

I water the planted container thoroughly, then water periodically through­out the winter. The bulbs should not sit in soil that is too wet, but you also don’t want them to dry out entirely.

To plant a ceramic pot with different species of bulbs, plant the larger bulbs first, then cover them with soil and plant the smaller bulbs. Fill the container with soil to just below the rim.

Lantana-in-Plant-Container-Design
Lantana-in-Plant-Container-Design

Gardening in Seattle makes overwintering bulbs in containers rather easy. I use mostly stoneware pots because they can be left outside through the winter. Our mild winters allow us to group the pots together tightly in our nursery and leave them outside for the season.

If your winter is just too severe to risk leaving the bulbs out or you want to use bulbs in a tall ceramic pot that can’t be stored in the cold, you have another option. Plant your bulbs in small 6-inch or 8-inch ceramic pots and overwinter them under protection outdoors or in a cold garage. In the spring, as they start to bloom, you can then sink the pots into larger display containers. Bring your  tall ceramic pots outside in the spring when the danger of hard frost has passed or when the bulbs in the ground are starting to emerge.

After the flowers have faded and the spring gala is over, I plant all the bulbs except for the tulips in the garden. Tulips tend not to do well in subsequent years, so I compost them. Then I start thinking ahead to the varieties I’ll be planting up in the fall for next year’s display.

Easy container combos with glazed ceramic pot

Learn to grow easy vegetables in great looking container combos. You’ll love the candid advice and even the “bloopers” as she trialed over 1,700 plants in 200 containers to gather the material. Vegetables and flowers can make beautiful pot buddies.

container-garden-designs
container-garden-designs

Keep It Simple

“Don’t mix too many veggies in a big glazed pot. Keep it simple, like one tall vegetable in the center surrounded by a few flowers. Or, some big bold vegetables like okra and squash do better alone.”

Use Pretty

Pretty pots add to the overall effect, but they don’t have to be expensive. We used colorful buckets from the dollar store with holes punched in them for drainage to add pizzazz without costing much. Nice supports like painted trellises help the overall look, too. Many things work as containers: buckets, bushel baskets, washtubs, old wicker baskets, round glazed ceramic pot. Make sure that homemade containers have drainage holes, or make them yourself. Larger veggies, like tomato and eggplant, will need at least a 5-gallon container. Use the largest pot you can afford and have space for, especially with the big summer vegetables like squash, eggplant, tomatoes, and okra. The big plants need the room for the roots to grow.”

glazed ceramic pot plant
glazed ceramic pot plant

Some Veggies Are Okay Alone, But Most Like Flowers

“Big bold plants can stand alone in a pot, but most look much better accented with flowers. Use large plants in the center surrounded by smaller flowers and trailing flowers. Great vegetable centerpieces include pepper, tomato, eggplant, collard, cabbage, and kale.”

Step:

Plant tiny veggies first. Add flowers later.

Space plants closer than if in the ground.

Vegetables are easier in larger pots.

Use colorful trellises and pretty obelisks for supports.

Production varies a lot, use 236 Habanero peppers from one plant.

Ceramic vases wholesale

Ceramic vases wholesale

vietnam outdoor glazed ceramic pot
vietnam outdoor glazed ceramic pot

This ceramic planter will grace your garden with style, creating a captivating display when filled with floral colour.

This stylish outdoor glazed pot will enable you to optimise the available growing area with the vertical, stacking section arrangements. The ideal solution if you find yourself with limited space and particularly useful in the greenhouse, where it can be planted with strawberries, herbs or other seasonal vegetables. Alternatively, hang in the garden, patio or even on a balcony and create a stunning visual arrangement with the addition of trailing ivy and vibrant coloured plants and foliage.

The tall outdoor glazed ceramic pot has a low-profile design and inscribed designs along the sides. Featuring sturdy ceramic construction, these planters have a distressed terracotta faux finish with gold accents. Perfect for indoor or outdoor use.

Tall Round glazed pot is a beautifully designed, basic planter. TheBlack Bronze color compliments any decor. Because the planter has no drainage holes, this helps prevent moisture from damaging valuable pieces of furniture in your home or office. It is a versatile planter suitable for both indoor and outdoor use.

  • Made of 100% ceramic glazed
  • No drainage holes help keep moisture inside the window box and help prevent water damage to furniture
  • Light weight and durable
  • Great for both indoor and outdoor use

Outdoor ceramic planter filled with plants & flowers add a welcoming splash of color to just about any setting. Sturdy heavy weighted concrete planters such as these also provide bollard like security to entrances and pathways.

Vietnam glazed ceramic construction results in a planter with a natural resistance to vandalism and theft. The cast-in drain holes help ensure a healthy substratum, an essential element for vegetation to flourish. Available in the color and finish options as shown.

New Design Glazed Ceramic Pots

A set of 2 New Design Glazed Ceramic Pots will help bring a touch of style and grace to any garden, patio or courtyard area. With a magnificent glazed effect finish, they can make an amazing focal point to showcase all your favourite flowers and are sure to be admired by all who see them. The warm colour acts as a marvellous foil for all kinds of foliage and floral colour, so why not place them where the sunlight can really bring out the beauty of their bronze colour tones.

New Design Glazed Ceramic Pots
New Design Glazed Ceramic Pots

Dimensions & Specifications

Brand: Hoang pottery

Dimensions: 65×70 45×52

Material: Vietnam Outdoor glazed ceramic pot

  • Weather resistant
  • Maintenance freeManufactured from UV-stabilised polyurethane for durability, they are good for retaining moisture and are also lightweight to allow them to be moved easily from one location to another.

 Made of glazed ceramic, the New Design Glazed Ceramic Pots is designed for years of use. The simple yet stylish look adds distinctive individuality to any updated setting. Sturdy casters let you move it from one room to another quickly and effortlessly. This Vietnam Outdoor glazed pot protects the planter’s base and allows for proper watering.

I wanted an ultra modern planter for an outdoor artificial tree in an atriium that can be seen from both the outside of my house and the inside. Used to have a large tree growing out of the house, but the area became messy and I extended the driveway and walkway, and paved (stoned) the bottom and went for a huge sculpture, tree and several smaller artificial bushes, a gazing ball, etc. and now people can’t stop raving about it when they come in or sit down in living room and eee it through the sliding doors. Being able to take the heavy rain and heat were of utmost importance to me.