Its never too cold containers

Evergreen boughs, interesting pods and cones, and colorful stems and berries are just some of the botanical materials you can weave into a tall ceramic pots for plants design. If you are fortunate enough to live in a warm part of the country, living plants are also an option. In regions where freezing temperatures are the norm, gardeners should be aware that the living selections available to them, such as conifers and hardy boxwood, will contribute to big outdoor ceramic planters aesthetics but may not survive winter; extreme temperature changes are often too harsh for their sensitive roots.

christmas pots
christmas pots

If a material looks good and stands up to winter weather, why not reuse it from year to year? The reusable red bamboo poles in this pot offer a strong vertical accent, while living variegated boxwood provides more verticality and a striking backdrop.

ceramic pot
ceramic pot

 

Tall, bold gestures such as these are especially important in winter designs. People aren’t as likely to stop and linger when the weather is blustery, so designs need to read well from a distance. For this tall ceramic pots for plants, I wrapped dried magnolia leaves around African knobs (available at dried-flower retailers). Reconstructing natural materials and arranging them in clusters is another great way to make designs pop.

As a rule, more variety equals more impact. When designing tall ceramic pots for plants, use this to your advantage. Although there is a plethora of textures in this combination, similar forms unify them. Moss-covered orbs, poppy pods, and African knobs dot the horizontal plane, while cinnamon sticks, pheasant feathers, and whitewashed cacao stems add height. The simple vintage wooden rice bucket grounds the combo. In cold climates, keep wooden containers out of the elements as wood cracks after repeated freezing and thawing.

winter pot
winter pot

Look to the colorful glazes and decorative etchings on tall ceramic pots for plants as a source of inspiration. The detailed carving on this container draws the eye up to the planting, while the mahogany-stained kuwa stems and black-spruce boughs continue the progression up and out. Luckily, creating winter containers doesn’t have to mean gardening in frigid temperatures. For this container, I filled a plastic grower’s pot with potting soil and arranged the planting indoors. Once I finished the design, I brought it outside and slipped it into my decorative container. This durable granite pot won’t crack in winter, but buyers beware: Once you put it in place, you won’t be able to move it until spring thaw.

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